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Residents’ Corner
1 (
3
); 122-123
doi:
10.25259/JHAS_31_2021

An interesting case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis

Department of Clinical Hematology, Nil Ratan Sircar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Corresponding author: Bilal Shoeb Kazi, Department of Clinical Hematology, Nil Ratan Sircar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. kazibilal22@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Kazi BS. An interesting case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. J Hematol Allied Sci 2021;1:122-3.

A 23-year-old girl presented with complaints of bone pains, recurrent fractures for 3 years of age, bilateral neck swelling for 8 years, and abdominal pain for 1 year. She denies any constitutional symptoms. On examination, there were no organomegaly and bleeding stigmata. Her CBC profile was absolutely normal. Her radiograph of B/L hip joint [Figure 1] revealed multiple punched-out lytic lesions with sclerosed margins and fracture left shaft femur. CECT of the abdomen [Figure 2] revealed a spleen of normal size with multiple hypodense lesions ranging from 1 to 10 mm in size. The visible axial skeleton including spine, ribs, hip bones, and B/l proximal femur showed multiple punched-out lytic lesions with sclerosed margins. The CT-guided biopsy of the osteolytic lesion was consistent with Langerhans cells histiocytosis corroborated by IHC staining for CD1a, CD207, and S100.

Figure 1:: Radiograph showing multiple punched-out lytic lesions with sclerosed margins.
Figure 2:: CECT abdomen showing hypodense lesions in spleen and punched out lytic lesions with sclerosed margins in the axial skeleton.

Declaration of patient consent

Patient’s consent not required as patients identity is not disclosed or compromised.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflict of interest

There is no conflict of interest.


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